What is my Sewing Machine Worth?

People often ask me how much their vintage sewing machine is worth. The truth is, I don't have that answer. In fact, I don’t believe anyone could give an accurate answer to that question. Some websites flat out refuse to even respond to this question, but here I'll give you some tips that may help you in determining to some degree for yourself.

When I personally sell a vintage sewing machine, the first thing I do is look online to see what similar models are going for, and I estimate a value from that.  Of course there are other factors to consider when determining a price.

eBay is a hot spot for finding vintage sewing machines, and once you do a search for a particular model, you’ll see any current listings. In addition, there is an option called ‘completed listings’ which you can select to see what past listings have sold for.  

The worth of a vintage sewing machine is also determined by the following factors:

  • The age of the machine. (the older models usually are deemed more valuable).
  • Whether the original accessories and manual are included.
  • The machines overall condition which includes the wiring, the condition of decals, whether there is rust or is missing parts.
  • How many are currently available for that particular model (the less available, the higher the potential value).
  • What someone is actually willing to pay (maybe there’s a sentimental value).

If you’d like to buy a vintage sewing machine and wondering what you might pay, take into consideration that most vintage sewing machines are sold as-is, and the majority of them will need a cleaning, servicing, and most likely need the wiring replaced and may be missing parts. Most sellers will not put the time, effort or money into refurbishing a vintage sewing machine; however, there are a few that do.  Check out some beautiful vintage sewing machines I have for sale. 

Some sellers even do full restorations on vintage machines which include a new paint job, new decals, and re-plating of the metal parts. These machines are beautiful, but doing this takes away the machines historical value. In the end, its the customer who determines what they want in a vintage sewing machine, and what they are willing to pay; whether it be a rusty machine, a re-furbished machine, or a fully restored one.

Also be aware that parts may be difficult to find for some models, so if there is a machine that you are interested in, it’s wise to do a general online search to see if parts are available before purchasing it. 

If you are looking for parts for a particular model or have questions Contact me. I have other resources for the finding parts that I don't have. I answer all emails the same day until 5pm EST. 
Thanks, Connie.


Check out these vintage beauties...
Left: 1948 Singer 15-90 -the same as the 15-91 but is belt driven.
Right: Visetti 42 precision Built, likely from the 1940's. A beautiful two-tone 'clone' of the Singer 15.
1948 Singer 15-90
Visetti 42